Masterfoods’ Mega Mistake

Last Friday, Stuart Elliot’s advertising column focused on Masterfoods USA’s introduction of the Mega M&M.  To be sold in 12.6- and 19.6-ounce bags, these M&Ms are 55 percent bigger than their standard-size counterparts.

It is fair to question Masterfoods’ serving up a product that is clearly feeding the fattening of America.  The company’s spokesman spins the answer by saying that M&Ms have always been about sharing with others.  As for the size, another spokesman said that "adults have said they like a bigger bite-sized product with bigger bite-sized taste."  To sum it up, Masterfoods doesn’t see this as contributing to America’s obesity problem.

Well, as someone once told me, you can’t spin a spinner.  Companies that sell unhealthy foods should be honest with their consumers.  Masterfoods is not.  It is trying to hide the reality that its product is unhealthy.  The company is doing more than simply misleading the public; in my book, this misguided product stands as another example of corporate America’s irresponsibility and unaccountability for its actions.

5 thoughts on “Masterfoods’ Mega Mistake

  1. I know they’re selling a product but there’s also something called corporate social responsibility. Adding to America’s obesity problem probably wouldn’t qualify them as a good corporate citizen.

  2. I know they’re selling a product but there’s also something called corporate social responsibility. Adding to America’s obesity problem probably wouldn’t qualify them as a good corporate citizen.

  3. And, a serving of M&M’s has the same amount of protein and dietary fibre as a serving of Kellogg’s Corn Flakes.

  4. HELLOOOO out there. They are selling a product! They are in business to make money! What do you think they should do… put fewer candy in the bags and give them away?