Jun 12

The only thing we have to worry about is worry itself

Many years ago, we had a management supervisor who literally fell asleep during client meetings. TheSleeping
first time it happened, we apologized to the client and warned the MS not to let it happen again. The second time it occurred, we moved him off the account and told him to fix the problem. When it kept happening, we parted ways.

Since he was reticent to explain exactly why he was passing out at work, we guessed there was some sort of serious sleeping issue. But, we never would have guessed he might have been getting too much sleep!

According to a new report, our chronically fatigued MS may have been getting too much sleep at night. It sounds counterintuitive, but too much sleep is just as harmful as too little.

Researchers say most people believe they’re not getting enough sleep. That perception, in turn, causes them so much stress that they don’t sleep. As a result, they go to work battered, beleaguered and believing they won’t be able to function. The truth is that most of us only need five or six hours. The problems arise (pun intended) when sleepers get too little or too much.

Fear of getting too little sleep, say researchers, is a root cause of the insomnia epidemic. The experts urge insomniacs to get up, walk around and distract their minds when they can’t sleep. Such activity actually enhances sleep since it distracts the mind from the fear of not sleeping.

Bottom-line? As FDR might have said, “when it comes to insomnia, the only thing we have to worry about is worry itself.”